2017 ALA Annual Conference Programs

Whole Person Librarianship: Libraries and Social Workers in Collaboration

Looking for Mobile Health Apps?

There are tons of health, fitness, and wellness apps on the market, so it can be hard to decide which ones might be the best.  To help people, the University of Utah Health Care system has compiled a list of basic mobile health apps suggested by their health professionals.  Many of the apps are free and available for both iOS and Android devices.

Visit the site to check out the list: U-Bar Apps

On the Booklist: Job Stress and the Librarian

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This book, applicable to all types of librarians, includes chapters on a range of topics, including dealing with difficult patrons, burnout, and physical and mental health.

Read the Book: Job Stress and the Librarian: Coping Strategies from the Professionals Edited by Carol Smallwood & Linda Burkey Wade (2013)

Social + Active at Work

It’s true that doing things with other people provides reinforcement for healthy habits. If you’re going for a walk at lunch and also need to talk to your co-worker about a program idea, why not invite them along and do both at once?

This article provides a rich list of ideas for incorporating activity, movement, and exercise into your socializing opportunities, events, meetings, and group activities at work from ACEfitness.org

Read it: “20 Active Ways to be Social at Work”

Feeling Slumpy? Exercises to help you de-slouch from The Art of Manliness

"Spending most of your waking hours planted on your keister is terrible for your health."

Here are 13 delightfully illustrated, excellent exercises to help you stretch out your spine, glutes, and hips (which often suffer the most from tightness) after day of sitting waaaay too much, otherwise known as “de-Quasimoding” yourself.

A do-able list of the best exercises, demonstrated by the www.theartofmanliness.com blogger himself (who sports one of the best mustaches this side of the Mississippi) with photos and clear instructions to follow along. Props used are inexpensive: a tennis ball, a pool noodle, etc. and could be done in-office as long as you don’t mind Grok squatting in front of passersby. Hey, your health is totally worth the stares.

Read it:

7 Simple Exercises That Undo the Damage of Sitting

De-Quasimodo Yourself: 6 Exercises to Counteract Slouching

 

 

University Libraries Add Study Bikes

A recent article from Huffington Post alerted us to this new trend. Troy University Library’s Dean, Christopher Shaffer installed FitDesk exercise bikes into the library, because: “Humans aren’t meant to sit all day.” He cites the impact of physical movement and wellness on mental focus and hopes to give students the ability to study without being sedentary.

Troy is just one of many university libraries that are installing bikes in order to encourage more active studying (Clemson University is another), and students and faculty are loving them. FitDesk bikes are priced rather inexpensively, so gather some faculty and students and get your administration on board–and in the saddle!

Read It:

(Troy University Library) College Adds New Spin To Studying, Installs Exercise Bikes In Library

(Clemson University Library) FitDesk Bike Desk: a healthy way to study

 

Image Source: The Auburn Plainsman, Contributed by June Pilcher, alumni distinguished professor of psychology from Clemson University