On the Booklist: Defusing the Angry Patron

Does your library have a plan for dealing with angry patrons both in-person and in the online environment? Think: angry comments on websites, blogs, social networks, or even chat?

Read the book: Defusing the Angry Patron: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians, 2nd ed. by Rhea Joyce Rubin (2011).

Librarians as Social Workers

Troubled, angry, forgetful, violent...there are many patrons who call on librarians to use their interpersonal spidey-senses, as well as reader advisory skills.

Librarians serve and interact with the public and must be prepared to encounter difficult situations as best as we can, to the benefit of all parties involved.

This article provides examples of a wide-range of scenarios you might consider for staff preparedness and training, as well food for thought as to what your own individual reaction would be to certain behaviors. Expecting, mentally rehearsing and therefore being able to confidently provide service (or enacting appropriate policies) when the time comes, can go a long way in diffusing and take some of the stress out of these situations you might encounter.

What’s more, by confronting the realities of the day-to-day struggles of “difficult” patrons, you may find opportunities to serve others and impact others in ways beyond literacy and access to information.

Read It:

How can librarians protect themselves against patrons who are troubled or violent?

by Richard Bermack

Gov Cuomo Signs Paid Family Leave Bill

In April 2016, Governor Cuomo signed a bill which will guarantee 12 weeks of partially paid family leave for NY State workers, to take full effect of 67% salary by 2021. This legislation also raises the minimum wage to $15 over the next several years. It’s important to note that family leave provides for paid leave for the care of a new child as well as any family member needing care. Let’s hope this sets a precedent for other states to join CA, WA, RI, NJ, D.C., and now NY in securing family and medical leave benefits.

Read more: Victory for New York State Families at www.governer.ny.gov

Urgent, Not-Important, or Somewhere In-between?: Using the Eisenhower Matrix to Prioritize Your Time

“What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.”

The Eisenhower Matrix is a brilliant visual tool that forces you to assign every task, event and desire, goal etc. in your work and life into just one of four categories, two of which are almost never necessary (can you guess which two these are?):

URGENT/IMPORTANT 

URGENT/NOT IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT/NOT URGENT

NOT URGENT/NOT IMPORTANT.

Ike knew what he was talking about! The Matrix is great tool for seeing (often painfully) how much time you spend on what kinds of things, as well as better choosing your priorities for the future.

Try it and let us know what it reveals for you in the comments below!

Read It: The Eisenhower Decision Matrix: How to Distinguish Between Urgent and Important Tasks and Make Real Progress in Your Life , a great summary and explanation of how to use it from, www.artofmanliness.com.

The Last Article on Procrastination You’ll Ever Need to Read (While Procrastinating)

Tim Urban: Wait But Why Blog Series on Procrastination

This is not your typical list of tips to beat procrastination that you’ll look at and then merrily continue on your journey down the internet procrastination river. This funny, but deeply insightful look at the phenomenon of procrastination is a truly original way to think about and manage it. 

Tim Urban knows that procrastination doesn’t make sense, but he’s never been able to shake his habit of waiting until the last minute to get things done. In his hilarious and insightful talk (before), Urban takes us on a journey through YouTube binges, Wikipedia rabbit holes and bouts of staring out the window — and encourages us to think harder about what we’re really procrastinating on, before we run out of time.

(Video) “Inside the Mind of a Master Procrastinator” Tim Urban TED Talk

[ted id=2458]

What Motivates Us?

RSA Animates interprets Dan Pink’s Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

This is worth a watch and a ponder: What actually motivates us if not money or recognition and how can we nudge ourselves and our libraries to incorporate more of these “true” motivators?

Read the full transcript here.

Social + Active at Work

It’s true that doing things with other people provides reinforcement for healthy habits. If you’re going for a walk at lunch and also need to talk to your co-worker about a program idea, why not invite them along and do both at once?

This article provides a rich list of ideas for incorporating activity, movement, and exercise into your socializing opportunities, events, meetings, and group activities at work from ACEfitness.org

Read it: “20 Active Ways to be Social at Work”

Feeling Slumpy? Exercises to help you de-slouch from The Art of Manliness

"Spending most of your waking hours planted on your keister is terrible for your health."

Here are 13 delightfully illustrated, excellent exercises to help you stretch out your spine, glutes, and hips (which often suffer the most from tightness) after day of sitting waaaay too much, otherwise known as “de-Quasimoding” yourself.

A do-able list of the best exercises, demonstrated by the www.theartofmanliness.com blogger himself (who sports one of the best mustaches this side of the Mississippi) with photos and clear instructions to follow along. Props used are inexpensive: a tennis ball, a pool noodle, etc. and could be done in-office as long as you don’t mind Grok squatting in front of passersby. Hey, your health is totally worth the stares.

Read it:

7 Simple Exercises That Undo the Damage of Sitting

De-Quasimodo Yourself: 6 Exercises to Counteract Slouching

 

 

University Libraries Add Study Bikes

A recent article from Huffington Post alerted us to this new trend. Troy University Library’s Dean, Christopher Shaffer installed FitDesk exercise bikes into the library, because: “Humans aren’t meant to sit all day.” He cites the impact of physical movement and wellness on mental focus and hopes to give students the ability to study without being sedentary.

Troy is just one of many university libraries that are installing bikes in order to encourage more active studying (Clemson University is another), and students and faculty are loving them. FitDesk bikes are priced rather inexpensively, so gather some faculty and students and get your administration on board–and in the saddle!

Read It:

(Troy University Library) College Adds New Spin To Studying, Installs Exercise Bikes In Library

(Clemson University Library) FitDesk Bike Desk: a healthy way to study

 

Image Source: The Auburn Plainsman, Contributed by June Pilcher, alumni distinguished professor of psychology from Clemson University